August hike to Lake Angeles

Join the members of the Natural History Society on Friday, August 15, for a hike to an alpine lake in the Olympic Mountains.

The Lake Angeles trail is a 7.4 mile round-trip, with an elevation gain of 2,300 feet. The trail starts just before the entrance to the Olympic National Park on the Hurricane Ridge Road.

Lake AngelesThis hike is limited to 12 people.  Please contact Pat at jltnatural@saveland.org for meeting time and place.

The Lake Angeles trail is a moderate to strenuous hike, so be prepared with plenty of water, food, good footwear, layers of clothes and sunscreen.

To read more about the trail go to: http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/seasonal-hikes/hikes/lake-angeles?b_start:int=10

 

August Book Club Selection

MooreThe Natural History Society Book Club will meet at 3:30 on Monday, August 25, to discuss Wild Comfort: The Solace of Nature, by Kathleen Dean Moore.

In an effort to make sense of the deaths in quick succession of several loved ones, Kathleen Dean Moore turned to the comfort of the wild, making a series of solitary excursions into ancient forests, wild rivers, remote deserts, and windswept islands to learn what the environment could teach her in her time of pain.

This book is the record of her experiences. It’s a stunning collection of carefully observed accounts of her life—tracking otters on the beach, cooking breakfast in the desert, canoeing in a snow squall, wading among migrating salmon in the dark—but it is also a profound meditation on the healing power of nature.

Please RSVP to Pat at jltnatural@saveland.org for location.

A challenging summer hike

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJoin us on Friday, July 18, for an all-day hike up to Marmot Pass. Our intrepid leader, Sally, reminds us that this challenging hike is 10.6 miles round-trip, with an elevation gain of 3,500 feet. Sally suggests we come prepared for cooler weather, wear good hiking shoes, and bring plenty of water and food, as conditions in the mountains can change quickly. The scenery will be spectacular and there should be many wildflowers in bloom at that time, so you might also want to bring cameras and field guides.

This hike will be limited to 12 participants, due to Buckhorn Wilderness regulations. To sign up, contact Pat at JLTnatural@saveland.org

For more information about the trail to Marmot Pass go to http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/marmot-pass-upper-big-quilcene

A Forest Service pass is required at the trailhead.

 

July Book Club Selection

BarcottThe JLT Natural History Society book club will meet at 3:30 pm on Monday, July 28, to discuss Northwest Passages: A Literary Anthology of the Pacific Northwest from Coyote Tales to Roadside Attractions, by Bruce Barcott.

In this vibrant anthology about the region and its people, editor Bruce Barcott endeavors to define the literary soul of the Northwest. Spanning two hundred years, Northwest Passages brings together writing from such natives, notables, and newcomers as Chief Seattle, Rudyard Kipling, Jack Kerouac and Sherman Alexie.

Please email Pat at jltnatural@saveland.org for more information and for directions to the meeting place. We look forward to seeing you there!

June Book Club Selection

David DouglasThe JLT Natural History Society book club will meet at 3:30 pm on Monday, June 23 to discuss The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest, by Jack Nisbet.

From 1823 to 1834, Scottish plant collector and naturalist David Douglas explored what is now Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, and the impact he had continues to be enormous today.

The Collector tracks Douglas’s fascinating history, from his humble birth in Scotland in 1799 to his botanical training under the famed William Jackson Hooker, and details his adventures in North America discovering exotic new plants for the English and European market.

The book takes readers along on Douglas’s journeys into a literal brave new world of then-obscure realms from Puget Sound to the Sandwich Islands. In telling Douglas’s story, Spokane-based naturalist Jack Nisbet evokes a lost world of early exploration, pristine nature, ambition, and cultural and class conflict with surprisingly modern resonances.

To RSVP, and for locations and directions, please contact Pat at jltnatural@saveland.org